Janice Campbell

Janice Campbell

Texas Homeschool Convention South Carolina Homeschool Convention Missouri Homeschool Convention Ohio Homeschool Convention California Homeschool Convention

Janice Campbell and her husband Donald homeschooled their sons from preschool into early college using a lifestyle-of-learning approach influenced by Charlotte Mason, classical learning, and the Thomas Jefferson method. Her books and resources reflect Janice’s focus on twaddle-free, literature-based active learning (she did have boys, after all!).

Janice speaks at conferences nationwide on subjects including literature and writing, high school and early college, teacher training for a learning lifestyle, microbusiness, and multiple streams of income for homeschool families. She is the author of the Excellence in Literature curriculum for grades 8–12, Transcripts Made Easy, and Get a Jump Start on College, among other things. She is also Director of the National Association of Independent Writers and Editors.

Whether teaching high school students to love literature or teaching writers and entrepreneurs how to create multiple streams of income, Janice’s focus is on lighting lamps so that others can more easily find their way. Her website, www.Everyday-Education.com, offers inspiration, resources, and a free e-newsletter.

How to Choose Curriculum that Fits (and Fix What Doesn’t)

A great curriculum can make learning easier, but how can you know which one to choose? Choosing curriculum is about more than buying books—it’s about knowing your students and their learning styles; knowing yourself and your teaching style, as well as knowing the most important things that must be taught and the primary ways that students learn. We’ll talk about how to work with teaching and learning styles, three skills you must teach, how to evaluate curriculum for the things that really matter, and ways to adapt almost any curriculum you buy (and what to do with the rest).

How to Homeschool High School (It’s an Education, Not a Rat Race)

What does a great high school education look like? If you’ve worried that it means giving up teaching in a way that fits your family, and transforming into a Ms. Gradgrind, demanding “facts, and nothing but facts,” worry no more. It’s entirely possible to create a high school experience that preserves the joy of learning while preparing each student for the appropriate next step in life. We’ll look at the following:

  • the primary purpose of the high school years
  • your role
  • things your student must know before graduating
  • records, transcripts, and gap years
  • interesting learning opportunities for homeschooled teens
  • and more.

You’ll learn which requirements are important; how to decide what each student should study; and how to tailor the high school experience to fit the student’s interests, aptitudes, and future plans. You’ll leave with the confidence that you and your teen can homeschool through high school with joy!

How to Plan Your Homeschool Year

Once you have committed to teaching your students at home, what is the next step? A peaceful, effective homeschool begins with a vision, simple plans, and a routine for getting the right things done. We’ll talk about how to set appropriate academic goals; how to do simple, streamlined planning and record-keeping; how to create a simple master plan (scope and sequence) for what you need to cover each year; and how to create routines that can help you stay relaxed and on track.

How to Teach with Living Books

Imagine a homeschool centered on books that are so interesting or thought-provoking that you would read them even if you didn’t have to. Those books are living books, and they come in every subject. Living books present a feast of great ideas in such a delightful way that students understand, remember, and even learn to care about what they are learning.

Join us to learn what living books are, why they are so effective, and ways to use them to study history, geography, science, the arts, life skills, and more. You’ll learn how narration, drawing, and model-based writing work with living books to build communication and thinking skills in an organic, memorable way. You’ll take home the confidence that you can teach in a way that helps your children love to learn.